The pace of development of Smart Grid technology means security has been left behind, and Smart Grid companies need to improvise to meet potential threats, according to the chief of industry advisory group, EnergySec.

“We’re not going to stop the roll-out of the technology, so what do we do when things go wrong?” said EnergySec CEO Patrick Miller. “We’ve got to try to find ways to implement new options in measurement and repair,” that will allow rapid response to failures and breaches.

Given the critical nature of the power grid and high profile of cyber threats to it, this is not a popular view with many security professionals. But Miller said installation of equipment already is under way and slowing down to wait for security to catch up is not an option, reports Government Computer News.

The US National Institute of Standards and Technology has been charged in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 with identifying and developing the technical standards needed to ensure that utilities, manufacturers, equipment testers and regulators will be working on the same page.

The agency recently released an updated version of its Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability that identifies technical standards for interoperability, and also is identifying security standards for the industry.

For more Smart Grid news