Landmark hydrogen power project in construction sector

The EU has revealed two energy strategies which EC executive vice-president for the Green Deal, Frans Timmermans, said were “ambitious, necessary and put us firmly on a path towards climate neutrality”.

The strategies cover energy system integration and hydrogen and both are designed to put the push for greater clean energy at the centre of Europe’s post-coronavirus economic recovery.

Read more about
The global hydrogen economy
EU Green Recovery Deal

Let’s take a quick look at what else each is intended to do. (For a deeper dive into the detail of each, check out my story).

The system integration strategy aims to – as Timmermans put it – “break the silos” of the existing energy model. Good plan, because the energy industry was firmly siloed for years and this kept it treading water instead of striking out into new waters.

This has started to change in recent years, however, any extra incentive to take a holistic view of the power generation, transport, industry, and buildings sectors – and get them collaborating with each other – is very welcome.

Welcome too is the hydrogen strategy, not least because it acknowledges that gas has a crucial role to play in the energy transition. Some years ago there was increasing chatter – which persists in some quarters – which suggested that the true energy utopia was one of total electrification. There was no room for gas – it was yesterday’s fuel.

Interesting talking point, and well worth a discussion. It would, however, be a discussion you’d be having in the dark if you tried to enable this electric dream because the lights would have gone out. Gas is now rightly seen as the enabler of the energy transition and there are few more exciting gas developments than those happening right now in hydrogen, so the EC is right to give the fuel it’s dedicated strategy.

And if you want some context to hydrogen’s role in Europe’s energy transition, plus an explanation of its potential, then do please catch-up with our webcast from last week, which tackled these very topics.

Until next time,

Kelvin

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