A UK company has secured £2m funding to further develop its batteries for use in energy storage and electric vehicles. 

Edinburgh-headquartered Dukosi won the funding from intellectual property commercialisation company IP Group, the Scottish Investment Bank and Scotland’s Par Equity.

Dukosi has developed a battery management system that collects, processes and stores data directly at the cell. Using wireless technology the system transmits real-time information on cell performance to support master level control of the battery pack.

The company says its approach enables improved design, deployment and management of batteries in electric vehicles, industrial and grid energy storage applications.

Following several years of research, development and testing, Dukosi is readying for production of its semi-conductor chip based solution that collects data at a cell level, to generate real-time state of charge and health results.

Dukosi says using its technology reduces battery complexity, removes almost all data wiring, improves measurement accuracy, and provides a history of each cell.

The company states that the demands of complex, high-voltage, multi-cell applications are pushing traditional battery pack management technologies to their limits and quotes analyst predictions that the battery sector for electric vehicles alone will rise to a $10bn market by 2020.

Dukosi chairman Clive Scrivener said the new funding would enable the company to take “the next step to make our vision a reality and bring a new level of intelligence to batteries”.

Jamie Vollbracht, director of Cleantech at the IP Group, said: “We back companies with transformative approaches to provide clean energy. Technologies that bring more intelligence to batteries represent a compelling area for investment.”

And Kerry Sharp, Head of the Scottish Investment Bank, said Dukosi was “a great example of a globally ambitious and innovative company developing new technology to support the expanding clean energy sector with applications in electric vehicles and energy storage”.