Iberdrola has completed the installation of all 70 wind turbines that comprise the 350 MW Wikinger offshore wind farm in the German waters of the Baltic Sea.

The company said it was “a new and significant milestone” as the windfarm enters the final phase of its commissioning.

Iberdrola has already completed the installation of the offshore substation and the inter-array cables connecting the turbines with the substation.

The transmission system operator responsible for connecting offshore wind farms in the German Baltic Sea to the mainland, 50Hertz, is currently performing the final cable-laying works and technical tests.

Iberdrola is now moving its Wikinger base to a bespoke operation and maintenance building in the port of Sassnitz.

With an investment of nearly €1.4bn, Wikinger is located off the northeast coast of the island of Rügen.

It will supply around 350,000 German households, representing more than 20 per cent of the energy demand in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, the region where the wind farm is located.

The wind turbines comprise a 222-tonne nacelle, a rotor that is 443 feet in diameter with 254-feet long blades, and a 246-feet high tower.

Iberdrola already operates the West of Duddon Sands offshore windfarm, jointly owned with Dong Energy and commissioned in 2014, and it has started building the giant 714 MW East Anglia One in the North Sea, which it expects to be one of the world’s largest offshore windfarms when it begins operation in 2020.

East Anglia One will cover an area of more than 115 square miles, and the cable that will transmit all of the power from the windfarm to the onshore facilities will be around 53 miles long.

In France, Iberdrola is also developing the Bay of Saint-Brieuc offshore windfarm, off the coast of Brittany, which will be equipped with 62 turbines of 8 MW capacity each and be located 20 kilometres offshore.