An array of 92 solar panels has been successfully installed on to a Grade 1 listed church for the first time.  

The solar photovoltaic installation that will allow visitors to see the cells from the ground, is the latest stage of The Churches Conservation Trust’s £2.7m regeneration of St Nicholas’ Chapel, Kings Lynn, UK in partnership with the Friends of St Nicholas’ Chapel and the Heritage Lottery Fund. The chapel is set to reopen in the autumn.
St Nicholas’ Chapel, Kings Lynn solar install
The cells will not only help to offset the chapel’s running costs by providing energy for the building, but will also provide an income for the chapel though the UK Government’s Feed-in Tariffs, which will play an important part in ensuring the long term viability of the chapel. This will be coupled with a new low energy heating and lighting system – currently being installed at the chapel – to help make the building more sustainable.

The project has also provided a learning opportunity for students enrolled on construction course at the College of West Anglia, who have been observing green technology installation as well as hands on experience with repair and conservation work.

Sarah Robinson, Director of Conservation at The Churches Conservation Trust, said: “We are delighted with the retrofit of photovoltaic cells onto St Nicholas Chapel as this represents our first major installation of green technology. The cells will help us better manage site running costs and act as an exemplar for other community groups wishing to undertake similar projects.”