Meteocontrol’s plant controller technology is being used to manage the largest zero-feed-in solar PV system in Turkey.

The company developed the controller in cooperation with Turkish EPC service provider Altungrup Solar Enerji, who is specialized in rooftop solar installations.
Meteocontrol
The 400 kWp rooftop system provides 90 per cent of the power needed each day to run the warehouse operated by Reysaş REIT in Antalya. The controller made by meteocontrol manages the inverter’s power in response to energy needs: If power production begins to exceed demand, the system is slowed down.

Reysaş REIT, a leading provider of warehouses and logistics facilities in Turkey has been installing photovoltaic systems on its warehouses for five years now.

In the beginning, the company fed the energy generated by the systems into the Turkish power grid. As a result of grid feed-in regulations, the investor has shifted the focus of newly installed PV systems to solely on-site energy consumption.

The first and largest zero-feed-in PV system in Turkey was installed on a warehouse in Antalya. The roof unit erected by Altungrup Solar Enerji as a turnkey solution produces 90 percent of the power the Reysaş GYT warehouse needs to operate each day.

In its role as project partner, Meteocontrol supplied the control and monitoring system. The Augsburg-based PV specialist used its own power plant controller, which meets all PV system grid-connection requirements, to perform the grid feed-in management. To implement the grid operator’s signals, the power plant controller measures relevant values at the grid connection point and passes on relevant commands to the inverters.

In larger PV systems, a constant comparison of target and actual yields takes place within a closed loop. This job usually involves managing active and reactive power.

“Zero feed-in creates a special challenge,” said Martin Schneider, Managing Director of meteocontrol. “No power may enter the grid – and this is exactly what we’ve accomplished at Reysaş REIT. Our power plant controller manages the inverters so they produce only the amount of power the building currently needs.”

The high on-site energy consumption rate of 90 percent has turned the PV system into an attractive investment: It will pay for itself in less than nine years. Power from the grid is needed only when solar irradiance levels are low: in the morning hours and late in the afternoon.