Large-scale temporary power for Australian state

A large-scale temporary power solution is being considered, as South Australia struggles to ensure its energy security.

A 250 MWà‚ ship-based power stationà‚ is under consideration as a solution to the crisis for theà‚ Australianà‚ state, which has seen a lot of investment in renewable power over recent years, while old fossil stations were retired.
Powership
The Turkish ship could be operational by the end of the year for less than the $360m budgeted for a new state-ownedà‚ gas-fired power plantà‚ of the same capacity.

The ship-based plant would plug into the high-voltage grid near the 479 MW Pelican Point power station, which returns to full capacity on July 1.

A second option would be for a 125 MW Powership at Outer Harbor and another of the same size anchored off Port Augusta, plugging into the grid near the site of the defunct Northern power station.

The Powership fleet can operate on natural gas, liquid natural gas or heavy fuel oil and it is likely the ship would be leased until a permanent plant was built.


The Istanbul-based firm, Karpowership, has installed the barge or ship-mounted power plants in Ghana, Iraq, Lebanon, Indonesia, Zambia, and Mozambique.

A national electricity market operator report released this week reveals a government-backed battery, temporary generators and every power station in the state must be up and running in tandem to prevent blackouts in the state this summer.

Adelaide Now online reports that opposition politicians are critical of the move, saying that using such ships, typically sent to war ravaged regions, shows the government’s poor decision making on power policy, linking it to the increase in residential electricity bills.

Opposition Leader Steven Marshall said “Had (the government) invested just A$8m a year in keeping the Northern Power Station open South Australians would have been shielded from these shocking electricity price rises.”à‚ 

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