The Carbon Trust has set up a group called the Energy Systems Innovation Platform (ESIP), which comprises Centrica, DONG Energy, SSE, Scottish Power, Wood Group-clean energy, and Statoil and aims to demonstrate the electricity system benefits of energy storage.

The group’s analysis will examine the various barriers in the way of investment in storage technology which could save the UK $3bn per year.

Project manager Nils Lehmann told S&P Global Platts, “ESIP will walk the talk of that report, acting on the insight that a multi-stakeholder effort by government and industry is needed to release system benefits,”
Carbon Trust
In a first step, the group is to investigate use cases for energy storage that help integrate wind energy into the grid.

The overarching aim is to balance the business interests of energy companies with government objectives to deliver a secure, decarbonized system at least cost.

If storage benefits the system as a whole, “there is a rationale for government to help end users or industry realize that effort, and it de-risks energy storage efforts,” he added.

The Carbon Trust’s storage report shows that, for domestic solar and storage, the best outcome for all is to aggregate the domestic storage solutions.

Then home solar/battery systems can provide flexibility services to the network, benefitting the wider system.

The Carbon Trust analysis shows that this can earn more for the end user than using it solely to maximise self-consumption, Lehmann said.

You can find more information on the context of the Carbon Trust’s Energy Storage Report here.