A major waste-fuelled combined heat and power (CHP) plant in Plymouth in the UK has come online.

The Plymouth Energy from Waste Combined Heat and Power Facility took three years and £250m ($365m) to build.

Around 245,000 tonnes per year of household, commercial and industrial waste will be burned at the plant, with the resulting 190 GWe and 60 GWth to be supplied to a neighbouring dockyard and naval base.

At the base, the waste-fuelled power and heating are to replace a gas-based system, cutting CO2 emissions by around 77,000 tonnes per year according to the plant’s operator MVV Environment, a subsidiary of Germany’s MVV Energie.

The plant has already received several awards and prizes for site management during construction, quality of its public-private partnership, environmental benefits and innovation.

Paul Carey, managing director of MVV Environment, said: “This facility is among the top plants of its kind in Europe with regards to energy efficiency and technical standards.”

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Energy-from-waste CHP plant nears completion