CCS

The European Union has granted €300m ($415m) towards the development of a carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in North Yorkshire, UK.

Officials said the White Rose CCS development in North Yorkshire had qualified for a grant under a scheme run by the European Commission to support renewable energy, grid integration and CCS projects.

The technique is seen as vital to maintaining fossil fuel power generation while simultaneously reducing their impact on the climate.
CCS
But the EU has fallen well behind the US and Canada in deploying the technology, partly due to its high cost, the Eurozone crisis and the collapse in the price of CO2 in the EU’s carbon trading system.

The Financial Times reports that White Rose will be a new coal-fired power station providing electricity to more than 630,000 homes. About 90 per cent of the CO2 it emits will be captured and injected beneath the North Sea. It will be built by Capture Power, a consortium set up by French engineering group Alstom, UK power company Drax and BOC, an industrial gas supplier.

White Rose will be built next to Drax’s power station, near Selby, which is in the process of switching generation from coal to wood pellets.

The UK government announced a £1bn competition for CCS seven years ago but has made little progress in getting carbon capture schemes off the drawing board. It has awarded engineering and design contracts for two schemes – White Rose and Peterhead. The latter will involve installing CCS on SSE’s gas-fired power plant in Aberdeenshire, and transporting it 100km offshore for storage in a depleted natural gasfield under the North Sea.

Peterhead and White Rose were selected from a shortlist of four projects but will go ahead only if SSE and Drax take a final investment decision to proceed – and that is not expected until late next year.

A report by the Carbon Capture and Storage Association and Trades Union Congress said widespread use of CCS would lead to a 15 per cent fall in the wholesale price of electricity and reduce household energy bills by £82 a year.

For more CCS news Officials said the White Rose CCS development in North Yorkshire had qualified for a grant under a scheme run by the European Commission to support renewable energy, grid integration and CCS projects.

The technique is seen as vital to maintaining fossil fuel power generation while simultaneously reducing their impact on the climate.

But the EU has fallen well behind the US and Canada in deploying the technology, partly due to its high cost, the Eurozone crisis and the collapse in the price of CO2 in the EU’s carbon trading system.

The Financial Times reports that White Rose will be a new coal-fired power station providing electricity to more than 630,000 homes. About 90 per cent of the CO2 it emits will be captured and injected beneath the North Sea. It will be built by Capture Power, a consortium set up by French engineering group Alstom, UK power company Drax and BOC, an industrial gas supplier.

White Rose will be built next to Drax’s power station, near Selby, which is in the process of switching generation from coal to wood pellets.

The UK government announced a £1bn competition for CCS seven years ago but has made little progress in getting carbon capture schemes off the drawing board. It has awarded engineering and design contracts for two schemes – White Rose and Peterhead. The latter will involve installing CCS on SSE’s gas-fired power plant in Aberdeenshire, and transporting it 100km offshore for storage in a depleted natural gasfield under the North Sea.

Peterhead and White Rose were selected from a shortlist of four projects but will go ahead only if SSE and Drax take a final investment decision to proceed – and that is not expected until late next year.

A report by the Carbon Capture and Storage Association and Trades Union Congress said widespread use of CCS would lead to a 15 per cent fall in the wholesale price of electricity and reduce household energy bills by £82 a year.

For more CCS news