COSPP Nov/Dec 2005

  • What is the average share of consumer electricity prices (all consumer types) that is accounted for by network costs? (A)
  • Is it cheaper to build a new 1,000 MWe power plant or to reduce baseload demand by the same amount? (A)
  • Taking both demand- and supply-side options, what are some of the least-cost means of reducing carbon emissions in the electricity sector? (A)
  • What are the life-cycle carbon emissions from a nuclear power plant? (A)
  • To what extent does the price paid for electricity by domestic (and many other) consumers go up at times of peak demand? (A)
  • What are the energy losses from the network at these times? (A)

The list could go on and on, and it is probably safe to believe that many of the key people involved in key policy decisions haven’t got a clue what the answers are, let alone the significance of the questions.

That’s not exactly a heart-warming thought to take with us into 2006.


Michael Brown

 

 

 

Answers to questions posed above

What is the average share of consumer electricity prices (all consumer types) that is accounted for by network costs?
The world average is probably in the range of 30%-40%.

Is it cheaper to build a new 1000 MWe power plant or to reduce baseload demand by the same amount?
This is complicated (reducing some baseload demand can be costly; reducing peak or mid-merit demand will usually be less costly than building new plant), but the question is rarely asked, the assumption being that the only option is to satisfy new demand rather than to limit it.

Taking both demand- and supply-side options, what are some of the least-cost means of reducing carbon emissions in the electricity sector?
CHP is usually one of the leading options.

What are the life-cycle carbon emissions from a nuclear power plant?
These are not insignificant, and certainly not zero.

To what extent does the price paid for electricity by domestic (and many other) consumers go up at times of peak demand?
Not at all - therefore there is no incentive to reduce demand at peak times.

What are the energy losses from the network at these times?
Losses can increase from 6%-10% (average) to 15%-20% at times of peak demand.

 


NEWS SUMMARY
Click on a link to view the full news item.

Nyserda to support 32 new DG projects
New York Governor George E. Pataki has announced US$15.5 million in funding awarded to support 32 new distributed generation (DG) and CHP projects throughout the State, totalling some 29 MW of new generating capacity. More

World energy use and carbon emissions to grow – EIA
Growing energy demand in the rapidly developing countries of Asia will help increase world energy use by 57% over the next 20 years, according to the US Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA).More

Fuel cells to supply hospital, sewage plant in Korea
Two 250 kW ‘Direct FuelCell’ units from US-based FuelCell Energy, Inc. are being installed to provide energy for a 650-bed hospital and for a wastewater treatment facility in South Korea... More

British CHP plant exported to Africa
An 18 MW CHP plant located in Bury, UK is being dismantled and moved to Newcastle, KwaZulu- Natal in South Africa, by new power plant developer IPSA. More

Arctic sea ice ‘in sharp decline’
Arctic sea ice is in dramatic decline due to global climate change – according to recent data released by the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).More

Largest solar water heating system in eastern US
A system of 1600 solar thermal heat collection tubes for a new student housing complex, the ‘green dorm’, at the University of South Carolina, US, has been supplied by Thermomax of the UK.More



Nyserda to support 32 new DG projects

New York Governor George E. Pataki has announced US$15.5 million in funding awarded to support 32 new distributed generation (DG) and CHP projects throughout the State, totalling some 29 MW of new generating capacity.

To be funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the 32 projects represent a total investment of more than $90 million in DG technologies and CHP applications when co-funding is factored in, reports the US Department of Energy, and over half of the projects will be fuelled by renewable fuels such as landfill or anaerobic digester gases.

NYSERDA’s DG/CHP programme has a successful history. Since its inception in 2001, the Authority has solicited DG/CHP projects through five rounds of funding, receiving nearly 500 proposals of which more than 100 CHP demonstration projects and 50 product development projects were selected for funding. As of today, 34 CHP demonstration projects are operational, producing more than 13 MW of electricity.

This fifth round for the DG/CHP solicitation received 79 proposals from which 32 were selected.

Projects selected for funding include:



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