GE gas turbine upgrade cuts emissions in China

GE has completed a major gas turbine emissions-reduction project in China.

It carried out an upgrade on nine of its 9E gas turbines that operate at plants run by five power generation companies in Shenzhen: Shenzhen Nanshan Power, Shenzhen New Power, Shenzhen Datang Baochang Gas Power, Shenzhen Yuhu Power and CNOOC Shenzhen Power.  

The upgrades involved the world’s first installation of GE’s DLN1.0+ with Ultra Low NOx combustion solution, which has been developed by utilizing data based on 43 million operating hours and reduces NOx emissions from 50mg/m3 (about 25ppm) to 15mg/m3 (about 7.5ppm).

And upgrading the turbines was vital to comply with Shenzhen municipal government’s ‘Blue Sky’ campaign, which requires all gas-fired plants in the city to lower its emissions below 15mg/m³ in six months – those plants that fail to comply will be taken offline.                

“Power generation companies are currently facing dual pressure from environmental indicators and economic performance,” said Liang Jianqiang, head of Shenzhen Nanshan Power Plant. “We continue to search for a two-way solution to help contribute to local blue skies while improving asset performance.”

He said the DLN 1.0+ Ultra Low NOx combustion upgrade was “a perfect fit for our needs…. we have succeeded in upgrading our plants while maintaining a steady supply of energy”.  

Yang Dan, chief executive of GE Power China, said: “The successful modernization of nine gas turbines in less than six months provides a reference for many 9E units to repower and adapt to the needs of the new era.”

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