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Energy efficiency bill ‘a missed opportunity’ for cogeneration

Fiona Riddoch, the managing director of COGEN Europe, says the Energy efficiency bill represents a missed opportunity for promotion of combined heat and power (CHP) as a vital fuel generator, considering the pressure Europe is under to deliver on 2020 power commitments.

Fiona RiddochSpeaking to Euractiv, Miss Riddoch outlined how the new bill militates against the growth of cogeneration in its present frame: “The European Commission is committed to strengthen the position of CHP through this review but with the current text it is unclear to what extent this will happen. The provisions on planning and supporting CHP with new policy structures ( Article 10 ) which involve heat and cooling plans, based on cost benefit analysis, to identify area with strong CHP potential will depend on good implementation in member states. This is a tough way to grow a sector.”

She added that, ‘Access to the grid for CHP electricity in Article 12 of the EED is looking weaker than in the original Directive which was not the Commission’s intention.’

On a more positive note Miss Riddoch said that ‘the planning of heat and power proposed in Article 10 could wake member states up to the significant efficiency benefits of this approach in the longer term. The Directive has some forward looking provisions on demand response, some small reference to CHP under 20 MW and specific provisions for micro CHP.”

She went on to express the belief that the bill represented a missed opportunity.

“Europe needs to save 20 per cent of primary energy by 2020 and to redouble its efforts on energy efficiency thereafter if it is to achieve its overall energy and climate goals. Roughly one third of all of Europe’s primary energy consumption goes directly into the electricity generating sector who then generate and distribute electricity at around 40 per cent of overall efficiency. If we want to reduce imports of fossil fuels and cut carbon then energy efficiency in the power sector is vital. CHP is part of that efficiency story.

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Cogeneration CHP, Energy Efficiency, Europe

Energy efficiency bill ‘a missed opportunity’ for cogeneration

Fiona Riddoch, the managing director of COGEN Europe, says the Energy efficiency bill represents a missed opportunity for promotion of combined heat and power (CHP) as a vital fuel generator, considering the pressure Europe is under to deliver on 2020 power commitments.

Fiona RiddochSpeaking to Euractiv, Miss Riddoch outlined how the new bill militates against the growth of cogeneration in its present frame: “The European Commission is committed to strengthen the position of CHP through this review but with the current text it is unclear to what extent this will happen. The provisions on planning and supporting CHP with new policy structures ( Article 10 ) which involve heat and cooling plans, based on cost benefit analysis, to identify area with strong CHP potential will depend on good implementation in member states. This is a tough way to grow a sector.”

She added that, ‘Access to the grid for CHP electricity in Article 12 of the EED is looking weaker than in the original Directive which was not the Commission’s intention.’

On a more positive note Miss Riddoch said that ‘the planning of heat and power proposed in Article 10 could wake member states up to the significant efficiency benefits of this approach in the longer term. The Directive has some forward looking provisions on demand response, some small reference to CHP under 20 MW and specific provisions for micro CHP.”

She went on to express the belief that the bill represented a missed opportunity.

“Europe needs to save 20 per cent of primary energy by 2020 and to redouble its efforts on energy efficiency thereafter if it is to achieve its overall energy and climate goals. Roughly one third of all of Europe’s primary energy consumption goes directly into the electricity generating sector who then generate and distribute electricity at around 40 per cent of overall efficiency. If we want to reduce imports of fossil fuels and cut carbon then energy efficiency in the power sector is vital. CHP is part of that efficiency story.

For more combined heat and power news

     

 

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